Welcome to

Museum History

onview
About us

ON VIEW

Then one day he was shooting at some food and up through the ground came a bubbling crude oil that is so lets make the most of this beautiful day since we are together space the final frontier these are the voyages of the Starship Enterprise.

  • Arts of Global Africa
  • American Art
  • Arts of Asia
  • Classical Art
  • German Arts
  • Decorative Art
  • Gardens
  • War History
  • Kings of History
  • Vintage Arts
  • Decorative Art
  • Gardens
  • War History
  • Kings of History
  • Vintage Arts
  1. testimonial
  2. testimonial
  3. testimonial

Then one day he was shooting at some food and up through the ground came a bubbling crude oil that is so lets make the most of this beautiful day since we are together space the final frontier these are the voyage”

antony fernandez

ceo, design hub

Then one day he was shooting at some food and up through the ground came a bubbling crude oil that is so lets make the most of this beautiful day since we are together space the final frontier these are the voyage”

antony fernandez

ceo, design hub

Then one day he was shooting at some food and up through the ground came a bubbling crude oil that is so lets make the most of this beautiful day since we are together space the final frontier these are the voyage”

antony fernandez

ceo, design hub
What Our Client Says

LATEST NEWS

Then one day he was shooting at some food and up through the ground came a bubbling crude oil that is so lets make the most of this beautiful day the ground then one day he was shooting at some food and up through the ground came a bubbling.

@ny.guide.museums
  • Anne set out for England. At the very end of December 1539, she arrived at Rochester Castle in Kent. The very next day, on 1 January 1540, the King paid a surprise visit to Cleves himself. Their first meeting ended in failure: Henry left the residence, exclaiming that he did not like the bride. Immediately after the visit to Rochester Castle, Henry wished to call off the engagement and instructed Cromwell to pursue the matter. But at this stage it was no longer possible to withdraw the proposal. The King of England and the German princess were married on 6 January 1540. The wedding night turned into a real disaster. Henry made it clear with all his appearance that the union was never consummated. According to the king, he was disgusted by his wife's appearance. Yet Cleves had incomparably more reason to be displeased: his husband was twice his age, by the time he was 48 Henry had become unbelievably corpulent, his waist measured some 130 cm in circumference, and his leg ulcer was constantly bleeding and giving off an unpleasant smell. Formally Henry maintained the image of a happy marriage: Anne attended all official functions, and the king was courteous and polite in her presence. Behind the scenes, however, there was a relentless search for reasons to dissolve the marriage. When confidants of the sovereign July 6, 1540-th came to the residence, where Anna was placed, to announce the dissolution of the marriage, the girl was at first confused, but soon gave her consent to unconditionally accept all the terms of the divorce. The fate of her predecessors, Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn, was not too tempting to the German princess. The divorce took place on 9 July 1540, so the marriage lasted just over six months.
The resentful, but very sensible Anne of Cleves, managed to negotiate the most favorable divorce agreement in the world. She became the King's "Favorite Sister" and received excellent financial security.
Here are a couple more portraits of her from the net.
  • After Jane Seymour's death, it took the King of England a long time to find a suitable candidate for a new wife. European princesses, having heard about Henry's character, refused English ambassadors. At the same time, the question of the king's marriage was a political matter. Thomas Cromwell dreamed of an alliance between England and a Protestant power: by the late 1530s, his sovereign had managed to quarrel with practically the whole Catholic world. Cromwell suggested that the king turn his attention to one of the daughters of Johann III, Duke of Cleves. The king demanded to see a detailed portrait of the potential bride. The future bride-to-be had to match the king's tastes without fail. Heinrich liked petite, delicate women with delicate features. Hans Holbein set out to paint her portrait. The English king was quite pleased with the result. Anne had pleasing features. She was tall, and her features may not have been as delicate as those of Henry's previous wives, but, according to several sources, Anne of Cleves was quite pretty. Looking at the portraits of the king's other wives, Anne does not look unattractive. The ambassadors reported to the king: "All praise the beauty of the Lady Anne, for both her face and figure are admirable. She far surpasses the Duchess of Saxony, as the golden sun surpasses the silver moon. All praise her virtue and honesty, together with the modesty which is clearly seen in her exterior." The Duchess of Saxony, Anne's sister, was considered an incredible beauty in Europe, Lucas Cranach was in love with her and depicted his muse on many canvases. (Anne of Cleves in Holbein's portrait and her sister Sibylla in Lucas Cranach's portrait). All in all, neither Holbein nor the English king's envoys were fools. There was no point in them embellishing Anne's appearance, for it would be obvious when they met.
The portrait of Anne of Cleves is not in the exhibition, but I will not leave you without the visuals of Anne and her sister.
  • The King's inconstancy spoils relations between the couple. Anne understands the fragility of her position and desperately wishes to bear Henry an heir. But, alas, another miscarriage occurs. In addition, the King has already found a new favourite - Jane Seymour, Boleyn's maid of honour. The fall of Anne and her entire family is inevitable. The king's wife was accused of witchcraft, treason, and incest. At her trial, Boleyn behaved with restraint and quietly denied all the charges, but was found guilty and sentenced to death by beheading.
Jane, radically different from Anne's predecessor in upbringing and appearance, was also liked by Henry VIII.   Jane was not attractive in appearance.(Her portrait is not in the exhibition, I am displaying it, but there is a sketch for it by Hans Holbein the Younger.)  Seymour's greatest assets were her meek disposition and tranquility. Henry VIII secretly betrothed Jane in May 1536 at Wyatthall Palace, just one day after the execution of his previous wife. Ten days later, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, married the couple. Seymour tried in every way to create a comfortable family environment. Thanks to her, her husband's daughters from previous marriages, Elizabeth and Mary, returned to the palace.
 Jane rose to the challenge of producing an heir, giving birth to a son at Hampton Court in October 1537. Henry's eldest daughters Elizabeth and Mary attended the christening of the long-awaited heir Edward VI, Prince of Wales, Earl of Carnarvon and Duke of Cornwall.  Jane suffered three days in childbirth. Henry was faced with the choice of saving the mother's life or the child's. Legend has it that the king replied, "Princes are rare now, and I shall find a thousand more queens.
Jane Seymour died ten days after her son's christening from maternal fever. The uncrowned queen was buried in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. Mourning continued at court until Christmas, Henry mourned his beloved until February 1538 and willed himself to be buried beside Jane. But he had no intention of dying any time soon.
Edward VI as a boy, 1538 by Hans Holbein the Younger
  • England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting.
Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican.
In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
  • Few people on the planet do not follow the life of the English royal family. Recently we said goodbye to the Queen. Princess Diana remains the most popular brand on the Internet.  But there are a number of other characters in English history that many, if not all, people know about. The Tudor royal dynasty.
Autumn's magnificent gift from the Met. A collection of art objects - the Tudors.
The Tudors were an English royal dynasty that ruled from 1485 to 1603. The Tudors are considered the most famous English dynasty.  The dynasty ruled for only 118 years. The Tudor dynasty came to the throne in 1485 as a result of a coup d'état. Its founder, Henry VII Tudor (1457-1509), was of Welsh descent and in the Middle Ages the Welsh were not generally thought of as English. But he had the blood of three royal houses in his veins. The outbreak of the War of the Scarlet and White Rose from 1455 to 1485 threw a different tentacles over the succession to the English throne, and in 1471 the Lancaster dynasty died out and Henry Tudor's rights became clearer. In 1485, Richard III died on the battlefield of Bosworth. Henry Tudor became King of England under the name Henry VII.
Henry VIII was born on June 28, 1491 in Greenwich, England. He became the third child in the family of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York.
At the age of fifteen, his older brother, Arthur, died. It was he who was to ascend the throne, but after his death the first claimant was Henry VIII. He received the title of Prince of Wales and began preparations for his coronation. Henry VIII reigned from 1509 to 1547. We will not examine the political life of this king. We will get into his bedchamber. It is these facts that are best known, or not, to the world's public.
His father King Henry VII sought to expand England's influence and strengthen alliances with neighboring countries, so he insisted that his son marry Catherine of Aragon, daughter of the founders of the Spanish state and widow of his brother. Catherine was six years older and the only surviving children of the marriage were her daughter, Maria.
  • a little positive in the feed
Немного позитива в ленту.
  • The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
  • We already know that antiquity gave us architectural orders. The Middle Ages changed the currencies and leaves of column capitals to amazing stone sculpture. In many monasteries in Europe, many scenes from the Bible, hagiographies of saints, allegorical images (as a confrontation of vices and virtues), as well as intimidating figures of demons and various monsters, beasts and men woven together, were carved on the capitals of columns on which galleries were leaned. The museum collection has interesting versions of such capitals. Capitel with four heads ca. 1225-50 In 863, a monk named Theodosius wrote of the greatness of Palermo, describing it as "full of citizens and strangers . . . Among the Sicilians, Greeks, Lombards and Jews mingled Arabs, Berbers, Persians, Tartars, Africans, some in long robes and turbans . . faces oval, square or round, of every build and profile, beards and hair of every color and haircut." The four heads emerging from the acanthus leaves and forming the corners of this capitol are indicative of Theodosius' comments. The heads are close in style to other examples of Apulian sculptors who worked at the court of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
  • In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
  • The Church taught that if sin entered the world through the first woman, Eve, then salvation from sin also entered through Our Lady Mary, for the atoning death of Jesus Christ was only possible after His earthly birth by Mary. In the East for the first time Her name was given to temples (4th century), Her images were painted, and church festivals were introduced in Her honor (5th century). The Council of Ephesus in the East in 431 deemed it possible to call the Virgin Mary "the Mother of God". Thus the cult of the Virgin Mary merged with the basic tenets of early Christianity and took a prominent place in this new religion.
The first known sculptural image of Our Lady, the so-called Golden Virgin of Essen, was commissioned by the granddaughter of Otto II, Abbess Matilda, presumably around 980 . This is how the sculpture returned to art. In the collection of the Metropolitan, the Virgin and Child in Greatness ca. 1175-1200 In medieval sculpture, individual body parts were often emphasized to convey meaning. Here Mary's huge hands direct our attention to Jesus, seated on his mother's lap. This type of sculpture, very popular in the twelfth century, is known as the Throne of Wisdom. As a miniature adult, Jesus as the Son of God is the embodiment of Wisdom. He would grab the Bible, another reference to the concept of divine wisdom he embodies. Mary is both a sculpture and a vessel: her body has a cavity behind her shoulder, suggesting that the work was a receptacle for holy relics. Such religious statues may have been carried in church processions.
  • #museum #Art #NewYork #МЕТ #Metropolitan #art history #Ancient Egypt #Ancient Greece #Ancient Rome #Middle Ages
  • Niagara - the name of the famous waterfall comes from the language of the Indians who lived here - the Iroquois and means, according to different versions, either "dividing in half", or, more poetically, "thundering water".
Niagara Falls appeared several thousand years ago, when streams of water formed as a result of the melting of a retreating glacier washed their channel in soft sandstones. The Niagara River carved a deep gorge into them until the harder rock was exposed. So it turned out a cliff from which thousands of tons of water fall down. The characteristic greenish color of Niagara is due precisely to the high content of rock particles dissolved in the waters of the river.
It is believed that in ten thousand years the waterfall has risen about eleven kilometers upstream of the river, this movement continues today at a rate of about thirty centimeters per year. According to scientists, in about fifty thousand years, the cliff will reach Lake Erie and Niagara Falls will cease to exist. Niagara is a complex of waterfalls, the total width of which is more than a kilometer. Goat Island (Goat) divides the river into two branches, forming the "Canadian" and "American" parts of the waterfall. The Canadian part of the waterfall is called because of the characteristic shape of the "Horseshoe", from the US side, a small island of the Moon separates a narrow strip of the "Veil" waterfall from the "American Falls".
The main volume of Niagara's water flows through the Horseshoe Falls. The width of the waterfall is about 670 meters, the depth in the central part is about 3 meters. Streams of water cross the crest of the waterfall at a speed of about 32 kilometers per hour and fall 53 meters down.
The width of the American Falls is about 250 m., the depth of the river on the crest is about 60 centimeters. Numerous rockfalls formed a huge stone embankment at the foot of the waterfall, so the height of the water fall here is much lower than at the Horseshoe - from 21 to 34 meters.
Near the American is the smallest of the Niagara Falls - Fata. It is only 17 meters wide and 24 meters high.
You can watch a ten minute video on my channel.
https://youtu.be/AfOef5vnldg
Anne set out for England. At the very end of December 1539, she arrived at Rochester Castle in Kent. The very next day, on 1 January 1540, the King paid a surprise visit to Cleves himself. Their first meeting ended in failure: Henry left the residence, exclaiming that he did not like the bride. Immediately after the visit to Rochester Castle, Henry wished to call off the engagement and instructed Cromwell to pursue the matter. But at this stage it was no longer possible to withdraw the proposal. The King of England and the German princess were married on 6 January 1540. The wedding night turned into a real disaster. Henry made it clear with all his appearance that the union was never consummated. According to the king, he was disgusted by his wife's appearance. Yet Cleves had incomparably more reason to be displeased: his husband was twice his age, by the time he was 48 Henry had become unbelievably corpulent, his waist measured some 130 cm in circumference, and his leg ulcer was constantly bleeding and giving off an unpleasant smell. Formally Henry maintained the image of a happy marriage: Anne attended all official functions, and the king was courteous and polite in her presence. Behind the scenes, however, there was a relentless search for reasons to dissolve the marriage. When confidants of the sovereign July 6, 1540-th came to the residence, where Anna was placed, to announce the dissolution of the marriage, the girl was at first confused, but soon gave her consent to unconditionally accept all the terms of the divorce. The fate of her predecessors, Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn, was not too tempting to the German princess. The divorce took place on 9 July 1540, so the marriage lasted just over six months.
The resentful, but very sensible Anne of Cleves, managed to negotiate the most favorable divorce agreement in the world. She became the King's "Favorite Sister" and received excellent financial security.
Here are a couple more portraits of her from the net.
Anne set out for England. At the very end of December 1539, she arrived at Rochester Castle in Kent. The very next day, on 1 January 1540, the King paid a surprise visit to Cleves himself. Their first meeting ended in failure: Henry left the residence, exclaiming that he did not like the bride. Immediately after the visit to Rochester Castle, Henry wished to call off the engagement and instructed Cromwell to pursue the matter. But at this stage it was no longer possible to withdraw the proposal. The King of England and the German princess were married on 6 January 1540. The wedding night turned into a real disaster. Henry made it clear with all his appearance that the union was never consummated. According to the king, he was disgusted by his wife's appearance. Yet Cleves had incomparably more reason to be displeased: his husband was twice his age, by the time he was 48 Henry had become unbelievably corpulent, his waist measured some 130 cm in circumference, and his leg ulcer was constantly bleeding and giving off an unpleasant smell. Formally Henry maintained the image of a happy marriage: Anne attended all official functions, and the king was courteous and polite in her presence. Behind the scenes, however, there was a relentless search for reasons to dissolve the marriage. When confidants of the sovereign July 6, 1540-th came to the residence, where Anna was placed, to announce the dissolution of the marriage, the girl was at first confused, but soon gave her consent to unconditionally accept all the terms of the divorce. The fate of her predecessors, Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn, was not too tempting to the German princess. The divorce took place on 9 July 1540, so the marriage lasted just over six months.
The resentful, but very sensible Anne of Cleves, managed to negotiate the most favorable divorce agreement in the world. She became the King's "Favorite Sister" and received excellent financial security.
Here are a couple more portraits of her from the net.
Anne set out for England. At the very end of December 1539, she arrived at Rochester Castle in Kent. The very next day, on 1 January 1540, the King paid a surprise visit to Cleves himself. Their first meeting ended in failure: Henry left the residence, exclaiming that he did not like the bride. Immediately after the visit to Rochester Castle, Henry wished to call off the engagement and instructed Cromwell to pursue the matter. But at this stage it was no longer possible to withdraw the proposal. The King of England and the German princess were married on 6 January 1540. The wedding night turned into a real disaster. Henry made it clear with all his appearance that the union was never consummated. According to the king, he was disgusted by his wife's appearance. Yet Cleves had incomparably more reason to be displeased: his husband was twice his age, by the time he was 48 Henry had become unbelievably corpulent, his waist measured some 130 cm in circumference, and his leg ulcer was constantly bleeding and giving off an unpleasant smell. Formally Henry maintained the image of a happy marriage: Anne attended all official functions, and the king was courteous and polite in her presence. Behind the scenes, however, there was a relentless search for reasons to dissolve the marriage. When confidants of the sovereign July 6, 1540-th came to the residence, where Anna was placed, to announce the dissolution of the marriage, the girl was at first confused, but soon gave her consent to unconditionally accept all the terms of the divorce. The fate of her predecessors, Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn, was not too tempting to the German princess. The divorce took place on 9 July 1540, so the marriage lasted just over six months.
The resentful, but very sensible Anne of Cleves, managed to negotiate the most favorable divorce agreement in the world. She became the King's "Favorite Sister" and received excellent financial security.
Here are a couple more portraits of her from the net.
Anne set out for England. At the very end of December 1539, she arrived at Rochester Castle in Kent. The very next day, on 1 January 1540, the King paid a surprise visit to Cleves himself. Their first meeting ended in failure: Henry left the residence, exclaiming that he did not like the bride. Immediately after the visit to Rochester Castle, Henry wished to call off the engagement and instructed Cromwell to pursue the matter. But at this stage it was no longer possible to withdraw the proposal. The King of England and the German princess were married on 6 January 1540. The wedding night turned into a real disaster. Henry made it clear with all his appearance that the union was never consummated. According to the king, he was disgusted by his wife's appearance. Yet Cleves had incomparably more reason to be displeased: his husband was twice his age, by the time he was 48 Henry had become unbelievably corpulent, his waist measured some 130 cm in circumference, and his leg ulcer was constantly bleeding and giving off an unpleasant smell. Formally Henry maintained the image of a happy marriage: Anne attended all official functions, and the king was courteous and polite in her presence. Behind the scenes, however, there was a relentless search for reasons to dissolve the marriage. When confidants of the sovereign July 6, 1540-th came to the residence, where Anna was placed, to announce the dissolution of the marriage, the girl was at first confused, but soon gave her consent to unconditionally accept all the terms of the divorce. The fate of her predecessors, Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn, was not too tempting to the German princess. The divorce took place on 9 July 1540, so the marriage lasted just over six months. The resentful, but very sensible Anne of Cleves, managed to negotiate the most favorable divorce agreement in the world. She became the King's "Favorite Sister" and received excellent financial security. Here are a couple more portraits of her from the net.
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
2/15
After Jane Seymour's death, it took the King of England a long time to find a suitable candidate for a new wife. European princesses, having heard about Henry's character, refused English ambassadors. At the same time, the question of the king's marriage was a political matter. Thomas Cromwell dreamed of an alliance between England and a Protestant power: by the late 1530s, his sovereign had managed to quarrel with practically the whole Catholic world. Cromwell suggested that the king turn his attention to one of the daughters of Johann III, Duke of Cleves. The king demanded to see a detailed portrait of the potential bride. The future bride-to-be had to match the king's tastes without fail. Heinrich liked petite, delicate women with delicate features. Hans Holbein set out to paint her portrait. The English king was quite pleased with the result. Anne had pleasing features. She was tall, and her features may not have been as delicate as those of Henry's previous wives, but, according to several sources, Anne of Cleves was quite pretty. Looking at the portraits of the king's other wives, Anne does not look unattractive. The ambassadors reported to the king: "All praise the beauty of the Lady Anne, for both her face and figure are admirable. She far surpasses the Duchess of Saxony, as the golden sun surpasses the silver moon. All praise her virtue and honesty, together with the modesty which is clearly seen in her exterior." The Duchess of Saxony, Anne's sister, was considered an incredible beauty in Europe, Lucas Cranach was in love with her and depicted his muse on many canvases. (Anne of Cleves in Holbein's portrait and her sister Sibylla in Lucas Cranach's portrait). All in all, neither Holbein nor the English king's envoys were fools. There was no point in them embellishing Anne's appearance, for it would be obvious when they met.
The portrait of Anne of Cleves is not in the exhibition, but I will not leave you without the visuals of Anne and her sister.
After Jane Seymour's death, it took the King of England a long time to find a suitable candidate for a new wife. European princesses, having heard about Henry's character, refused English ambassadors. At the same time, the question of the king's marriage was a political matter. Thomas Cromwell dreamed of an alliance between England and a Protestant power: by the late 1530s, his sovereign had managed to quarrel with practically the whole Catholic world. Cromwell suggested that the king turn his attention to one of the daughters of Johann III, Duke of Cleves. The king demanded to see a detailed portrait of the potential bride. The future bride-to-be had to match the king's tastes without fail. Heinrich liked petite, delicate women with delicate features. Hans Holbein set out to paint her portrait. The English king was quite pleased with the result. Anne had pleasing features. She was tall, and her features may not have been as delicate as those of Henry's previous wives, but, according to several sources, Anne of Cleves was quite pretty. Looking at the portraits of the king's other wives, Anne does not look unattractive. The ambassadors reported to the king: "All praise the beauty of the Lady Anne, for both her face and figure are admirable. She far surpasses the Duchess of Saxony, as the golden sun surpasses the silver moon. All praise her virtue and honesty, together with the modesty which is clearly seen in her exterior." The Duchess of Saxony, Anne's sister, was considered an incredible beauty in Europe, Lucas Cranach was in love with her and depicted his muse on many canvases. (Anne of Cleves in Holbein's portrait and her sister Sibylla in Lucas Cranach's portrait). All in all, neither Holbein nor the English king's envoys were fools. There was no point in them embellishing Anne's appearance, for it would be obvious when they met.
The portrait of Anne of Cleves is not in the exhibition, but I will not leave you without the visuals of Anne and her sister.
After Jane Seymour's death, it took the King of England a long time to find a suitable candidate for a new wife. European princesses, having heard about Henry's character, refused English ambassadors. At the same time, the question of the king's marriage was a political matter. Thomas Cromwell dreamed of an alliance between England and a Protestant power: by the late 1530s, his sovereign had managed to quarrel with practically the whole Catholic world. Cromwell suggested that the king turn his attention to one of the daughters of Johann III, Duke of Cleves. The king demanded to see a detailed portrait of the potential bride. The future bride-to-be had to match the king's tastes without fail. Heinrich liked petite, delicate women with delicate features. Hans Holbein set out to paint her portrait. The English king was quite pleased with the result. Anne had pleasing features. She was tall, and her features may not have been as delicate as those of Henry's previous wives, but, according to several sources, Anne of Cleves was quite pretty. Looking at the portraits of the king's other wives, Anne does not look unattractive. The ambassadors reported to the king: "All praise the beauty of the Lady Anne, for both her face and figure are admirable. She far surpasses the Duchess of Saxony, as the golden sun surpasses the silver moon. All praise her virtue and honesty, together with the modesty which is clearly seen in her exterior." The Duchess of Saxony, Anne's sister, was considered an incredible beauty in Europe, Lucas Cranach was in love with her and depicted his muse on many canvases. (Anne of Cleves in Holbein's portrait and her sister Sibylla in Lucas Cranach's portrait). All in all, neither Holbein nor the English king's envoys were fools. There was no point in them embellishing Anne's appearance, for it would be obvious when they met.
The portrait of Anne of Cleves is not in the exhibition, but I will not leave you without the visuals of Anne and her sister.
After Jane Seymour's death, it took the King of England a long time to find a suitable candidate for a new wife. European princesses, having heard about Henry's character, refused English ambassadors. At the same time, the question of the king's marriage was a political matter. Thomas Cromwell dreamed of an alliance between England and a Protestant power: by the late 1530s, his sovereign had managed to quarrel with practically the whole Catholic world. Cromwell suggested that the king turn his attention to one of the daughters of Johann III, Duke of Cleves. The king demanded to see a detailed portrait of the potential bride. The future bride-to-be had to match the king's tastes without fail. Heinrich liked petite, delicate women with delicate features. Hans Holbein set out to paint her portrait. The English king was quite pleased with the result. Anne had pleasing features. She was tall, and her features may not have been as delicate as those of Henry's previous wives, but, according to several sources, Anne of Cleves was quite pretty. Looking at the portraits of the king's other wives, Anne does not look unattractive. The ambassadors reported to the king: "All praise the beauty of the Lady Anne, for both her face and figure are admirable. She far surpasses the Duchess of Saxony, as the golden sun surpasses the silver moon. All praise her virtue and honesty, together with the modesty which is clearly seen in her exterior." The Duchess of Saxony, Anne's sister, was considered an incredible beauty in Europe, Lucas Cranach was in love with her and depicted his muse on many canvases. (Anne of Cleves in Holbein's portrait and her sister Sibylla in Lucas Cranach's portrait). All in all, neither Holbein nor the English king's envoys were fools. There was no point in them embellishing Anne's appearance, for it would be obvious when they met. The portrait of Anne of Cleves is not in the exhibition, but I will not leave you without the visuals of Anne and her sister.
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
3/15
The King's inconstancy spoils relations between the couple. Anne understands the fragility of her position and desperately wishes to bear Henry an heir. But, alas, another miscarriage occurs. In addition, the King has already found a new favourite - Jane Seymour, Boleyn's maid of honour. The fall of Anne and her entire family is inevitable. The king's wife was accused of witchcraft, treason, and incest. At her trial, Boleyn behaved with restraint and quietly denied all the charges, but was found guilty and sentenced to death by beheading.
Jane, radically different from Anne's predecessor in upbringing and appearance, was also liked by Henry VIII.   Jane was not attractive in appearance.(Her portrait is not in the exhibition, I am displaying it, but there is a sketch for it by Hans Holbein the Younger.)  Seymour's greatest assets were her meek disposition and tranquility. Henry VIII secretly betrothed Jane in May 1536 at Wyatthall Palace, just one day after the execution of his previous wife. Ten days later, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, married the couple. Seymour tried in every way to create a comfortable family environment. Thanks to her, her husband's daughters from previous marriages, Elizabeth and Mary, returned to the palace.
 Jane rose to the challenge of producing an heir, giving birth to a son at Hampton Court in October 1537. Henry's eldest daughters Elizabeth and Mary attended the christening of the long-awaited heir Edward VI, Prince of Wales, Earl of Carnarvon and Duke of Cornwall.  Jane suffered three days in childbirth. Henry was faced with the choice of saving the mother's life or the child's. Legend has it that the king replied, "Princes are rare now, and I shall find a thousand more queens.
Jane Seymour died ten days after her son's christening from maternal fever. The uncrowned queen was buried in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. Mourning continued at court until Christmas, Henry mourned his beloved until February 1538 and willed himself to be buried beside Jane. But he had no intention of dying any time soon.
Edward VI as a boy, 1538 by Hans Holbein the Younger
The King's inconstancy spoils relations between the couple. Anne understands the fragility of her position and desperately wishes to bear Henry an heir. But, alas, another miscarriage occurs. In addition, the King has already found a new favourite - Jane Seymour, Boleyn's maid of honour. The fall of Anne and her entire family is inevitable. The king's wife was accused of witchcraft, treason, and incest. At her trial, Boleyn behaved with restraint and quietly denied all the charges, but was found guilty and sentenced to death by beheading.
Jane, radically different from Anne's predecessor in upbringing and appearance, was also liked by Henry VIII.   Jane was not attractive in appearance.(Her portrait is not in the exhibition, I am displaying it, but there is a sketch for it by Hans Holbein the Younger.)  Seymour's greatest assets were her meek disposition and tranquility. Henry VIII secretly betrothed Jane in May 1536 at Wyatthall Palace, just one day after the execution of his previous wife. Ten days later, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, married the couple. Seymour tried in every way to create a comfortable family environment. Thanks to her, her husband's daughters from previous marriages, Elizabeth and Mary, returned to the palace.
 Jane rose to the challenge of producing an heir, giving birth to a son at Hampton Court in October 1537. Henry's eldest daughters Elizabeth and Mary attended the christening of the long-awaited heir Edward VI, Prince of Wales, Earl of Carnarvon and Duke of Cornwall.  Jane suffered three days in childbirth. Henry was faced with the choice of saving the mother's life or the child's. Legend has it that the king replied, "Princes are rare now, and I shall find a thousand more queens.
Jane Seymour died ten days after her son's christening from maternal fever. The uncrowned queen was buried in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. Mourning continued at court until Christmas, Henry mourned his beloved until February 1538 and willed himself to be buried beside Jane. But he had no intention of dying any time soon.
Edward VI as a boy, 1538 by Hans Holbein the Younger
The King's inconstancy spoils relations between the couple. Anne understands the fragility of her position and desperately wishes to bear Henry an heir. But, alas, another miscarriage occurs. In addition, the King has already found a new favourite - Jane Seymour, Boleyn's maid of honour. The fall of Anne and her entire family is inevitable. The king's wife was accused of witchcraft, treason, and incest. At her trial, Boleyn behaved with restraint and quietly denied all the charges, but was found guilty and sentenced to death by beheading.
Jane, radically different from Anne's predecessor in upbringing and appearance, was also liked by Henry VIII.   Jane was not attractive in appearance.(Her portrait is not in the exhibition, I am displaying it, but there is a sketch for it by Hans Holbein the Younger.)  Seymour's greatest assets were her meek disposition and tranquility. Henry VIII secretly betrothed Jane in May 1536 at Wyatthall Palace, just one day after the execution of his previous wife. Ten days later, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, married the couple. Seymour tried in every way to create a comfortable family environment. Thanks to her, her husband's daughters from previous marriages, Elizabeth and Mary, returned to the palace.
 Jane rose to the challenge of producing an heir, giving birth to a son at Hampton Court in October 1537. Henry's eldest daughters Elizabeth and Mary attended the christening of the long-awaited heir Edward VI, Prince of Wales, Earl of Carnarvon and Duke of Cornwall.  Jane suffered three days in childbirth. Henry was faced with the choice of saving the mother's life or the child's. Legend has it that the king replied, "Princes are rare now, and I shall find a thousand more queens.
Jane Seymour died ten days after her son's christening from maternal fever. The uncrowned queen was buried in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. Mourning continued at court until Christmas, Henry mourned his beloved until February 1538 and willed himself to be buried beside Jane. But he had no intention of dying any time soon.
Edward VI as a boy, 1538 by Hans Holbein the Younger
The King's inconstancy spoils relations between the couple. Anne understands the fragility of her position and desperately wishes to bear Henry an heir. But, alas, another miscarriage occurs. In addition, the King has already found a new favourite - Jane Seymour, Boleyn's maid of honour. The fall of Anne and her entire family is inevitable. The king's wife was accused of witchcraft, treason, and incest. At her trial, Boleyn behaved with restraint and quietly denied all the charges, but was found guilty and sentenced to death by beheading. Jane, radically different from Anne's predecessor in upbringing and appearance, was also liked by Henry VIII.   Jane was not attractive in appearance.(Her portrait is not in the exhibition, I am displaying it, but there is a sketch for it by Hans Holbein the Younger.)  Seymour's greatest assets were her meek disposition and tranquility. Henry VIII secretly betrothed Jane in May 1536 at Wyatthall Palace, just one day after the execution of his previous wife. Ten days later, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, married the couple. Seymour tried in every way to create a comfortable family environment. Thanks to her, her husband's daughters from previous marriages, Elizabeth and Mary, returned to the palace. Jane rose to the challenge of producing an heir, giving birth to a son at Hampton Court in October 1537. Henry's eldest daughters Elizabeth and Mary attended the christening of the long-awaited heir Edward VI, Prince of Wales, Earl of Carnarvon and Duke of Cornwall.  Jane suffered three days in childbirth. Henry was faced with the choice of saving the mother's life or the child's. Legend has it that the king replied, "Princes are rare now, and I shall find a thousand more queens. Jane Seymour died ten days after her son's christening from maternal fever. The uncrowned queen was buried in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. Mourning continued at court until Christmas, Henry mourned his beloved until February 1538 and willed himself to be buried beside Jane. But he had no intention of dying any time soon. Edward VI as a boy, 1538 by Hans Holbein the Younger
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
4/15
England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting.
Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican.
In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting.
Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican.
In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting.
Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican.
In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting.
Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican.
In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting.
Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican.
In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting.
Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican.
In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting.
Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican.
In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting.
Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican.
In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
England was returning to Henry VII's balance of power policy, championed in Henry VIII's time by Woolsey, then Lord Chancellor of the Realm and Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. If you're in London, visit Hampton Court. This royal palace was Henry's residence, but originally belonged to Wolsey. When the chancellor fell into disfavor, he presented the palace as a gift to the king. This delayed its fall, but it did not save it. Pictures of the palace are on display. It is amazing and very interesting. Henry is young, handsome (especially in the serial version - also recommended). There is only one problem - he has no son. He changes mistresses, but stumbles on Anne Boleyn, who is not as compliant as his sister Mary, who has already bored the King's irrepressible nature. I am displaying a portrait of Anne Boleyn that is not in the exhibition, but is a sketch. The King paid Anne many attentions, sending expensive gifts and love letters, in which he openly offered to become his mistress, but was refused. Anne gently rejected the advances and teased Henry: she wanted only to be his wife, not his mistress. Henry had long sought an excuse to dissolve his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and take a new wife who, would bring him an heir. The king decided to ask the Vatican to annul his union with Catherine. For six long years the King tried to dissolve the marriage. It is thought that it was Anne Boleyn who encouraged Henry to break with the Catholic Church and make England independent of the authority of the Pope. Henry himself was not satisfied with his position as a vassal of the Vatican. In 1531, Catherine was removed from the palace, her quarters given to Anne.  The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's previous marriage illegitimate. The official wedding took place in London on 25 January 1533. In the same year, Pope Clement VII excommunicated Henry. On September 7, 1533, Princess Elizabeth was born. Henry was disappointed. We'll look at Elizabeth's portraits later, but for now all about Henry....
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
5/15
Few people on the planet do not follow the life of the English royal family. Recently we said goodbye to the Queen. Princess Diana remains the most popular brand on the Internet.  But there are a number of other characters in English history that many, if not all, people know about. The Tudor royal dynasty.
Autumn's magnificent gift from the Met. A collection of art objects - the Tudors.
The Tudors were an English royal dynasty that ruled from 1485 to 1603. The Tudors are considered the most famous English dynasty.  The dynasty ruled for only 118 years. The Tudor dynasty came to the throne in 1485 as a result of a coup d'état. Its founder, Henry VII Tudor (1457-1509), was of Welsh descent and in the Middle Ages the Welsh were not generally thought of as English. But he had the blood of three royal houses in his veins. The outbreak of the War of the Scarlet and White Rose from 1455 to 1485 threw a different tentacles over the succession to the English throne, and in 1471 the Lancaster dynasty died out and Henry Tudor's rights became clearer. In 1485, Richard III died on the battlefield of Bosworth. Henry Tudor became King of England under the name Henry VII.
Henry VIII was born on June 28, 1491 in Greenwich, England. He became the third child in the family of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York.
At the age of fifteen, his older brother, Arthur, died. It was he who was to ascend the throne, but after his death the first claimant was Henry VIII. He received the title of Prince of Wales and began preparations for his coronation. Henry VIII reigned from 1509 to 1547. We will not examine the political life of this king. We will get into his bedchamber. It is these facts that are best known, or not, to the world's public.
His father King Henry VII sought to expand England's influence and strengthen alliances with neighboring countries, so he insisted that his son marry Catherine of Aragon, daughter of the founders of the Spanish state and widow of his brother. Catherine was six years older and the only surviving children of the marriage were her daughter, Maria.
Few people on the planet do not follow the life of the English royal family. Recently we said goodbye to the Queen. Princess Diana remains the most popular brand on the Internet.  But there are a number of other characters in English history that many, if not all, people know about. The Tudor royal dynasty.
Autumn's magnificent gift from the Met. A collection of art objects - the Tudors.
The Tudors were an English royal dynasty that ruled from 1485 to 1603. The Tudors are considered the most famous English dynasty.  The dynasty ruled for only 118 years. The Tudor dynasty came to the throne in 1485 as a result of a coup d'état. Its founder, Henry VII Tudor (1457-1509), was of Welsh descent and in the Middle Ages the Welsh were not generally thought of as English. But he had the blood of three royal houses in his veins. The outbreak of the War of the Scarlet and White Rose from 1455 to 1485 threw a different tentacles over the succession to the English throne, and in 1471 the Lancaster dynasty died out and Henry Tudor's rights became clearer. In 1485, Richard III died on the battlefield of Bosworth. Henry Tudor became King of England under the name Henry VII.
Henry VIII was born on June 28, 1491 in Greenwich, England. He became the third child in the family of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York.
At the age of fifteen, his older brother, Arthur, died. It was he who was to ascend the throne, but after his death the first claimant was Henry VIII. He received the title of Prince of Wales and began preparations for his coronation. Henry VIII reigned from 1509 to 1547. We will not examine the political life of this king. We will get into his bedchamber. It is these facts that are best known, or not, to the world's public.
His father King Henry VII sought to expand England's influence and strengthen alliances with neighboring countries, so he insisted that his son marry Catherine of Aragon, daughter of the founders of the Spanish state and widow of his brother. Catherine was six years older and the only surviving children of the marriage were her daughter, Maria.
Few people on the planet do not follow the life of the English royal family. Recently we said goodbye to the Queen. Princess Diana remains the most popular brand on the Internet.  But there are a number of other characters in English history that many, if not all, people know about. The Tudor royal dynasty.
Autumn's magnificent gift from the Met. A collection of art objects - the Tudors.
The Tudors were an English royal dynasty that ruled from 1485 to 1603. The Tudors are considered the most famous English dynasty.  The dynasty ruled for only 118 years. The Tudor dynasty came to the throne in 1485 as a result of a coup d'état. Its founder, Henry VII Tudor (1457-1509), was of Welsh descent and in the Middle Ages the Welsh were not generally thought of as English. But he had the blood of three royal houses in his veins. The outbreak of the War of the Scarlet and White Rose from 1455 to 1485 threw a different tentacles over the succession to the English throne, and in 1471 the Lancaster dynasty died out and Henry Tudor's rights became clearer. In 1485, Richard III died on the battlefield of Bosworth. Henry Tudor became King of England under the name Henry VII.
Henry VIII was born on June 28, 1491 in Greenwich, England. He became the third child in the family of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York.
At the age of fifteen, his older brother, Arthur, died. It was he who was to ascend the throne, but after his death the first claimant was Henry VIII. He received the title of Prince of Wales and began preparations for his coronation. Henry VIII reigned from 1509 to 1547. We will not examine the political life of this king. We will get into his bedchamber. It is these facts that are best known, or not, to the world's public.
His father King Henry VII sought to expand England's influence and strengthen alliances with neighboring countries, so he insisted that his son marry Catherine of Aragon, daughter of the founders of the Spanish state and widow of his brother. Catherine was six years older and the only surviving children of the marriage were her daughter, Maria.
Few people on the planet do not follow the life of the English royal family. Recently we said goodbye to the Queen. Princess Diana remains the most popular brand on the Internet.  But there are a number of other characters in English history that many, if not all, people know about. The Tudor royal dynasty.
Autumn's magnificent gift from the Met. A collection of art objects - the Tudors.
The Tudors were an English royal dynasty that ruled from 1485 to 1603. The Tudors are considered the most famous English dynasty.  The dynasty ruled for only 118 years. The Tudor dynasty came to the throne in 1485 as a result of a coup d'état. Its founder, Henry VII Tudor (1457-1509), was of Welsh descent and in the Middle Ages the Welsh were not generally thought of as English. But he had the blood of three royal houses in his veins. The outbreak of the War of the Scarlet and White Rose from 1455 to 1485 threw a different tentacles over the succession to the English throne, and in 1471 the Lancaster dynasty died out and Henry Tudor's rights became clearer. In 1485, Richard III died on the battlefield of Bosworth. Henry Tudor became King of England under the name Henry VII.
Henry VIII was born on June 28, 1491 in Greenwich, England. He became the third child in the family of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York.
At the age of fifteen, his older brother, Arthur, died. It was he who was to ascend the throne, but after his death the first claimant was Henry VIII. He received the title of Prince of Wales and began preparations for his coronation. Henry VIII reigned from 1509 to 1547. We will not examine the political life of this king. We will get into his bedchamber. It is these facts that are best known, or not, to the world's public.
His father King Henry VII sought to expand England's influence and strengthen alliances with neighboring countries, so he insisted that his son marry Catherine of Aragon, daughter of the founders of the Spanish state and widow of his brother. Catherine was six years older and the only surviving children of the marriage were her daughter, Maria.
Few people on the planet do not follow the life of the English royal family. Recently we said goodbye to the Queen. Princess Diana remains the most popular brand on the Internet.  But there are a number of other characters in English history that many, if not all, people know about. The Tudor royal dynasty. Autumn's magnificent gift from the Met. A collection of art objects - the Tudors. The Tudors were an English royal dynasty that ruled from 1485 to 1603. The Tudors are considered the most famous English dynasty.  The dynasty ruled for only 118 years. The Tudor dynasty came to the throne in 1485 as a result of a coup d'état. Its founder, Henry VII Tudor (1457-1509), was of Welsh descent and in the Middle Ages the Welsh were not generally thought of as English. But he had the blood of three royal houses in his veins. The outbreak of the War of the Scarlet and White Rose from 1455 to 1485 threw a different tentacles over the succession to the English throne, and in 1471 the Lancaster dynasty died out and Henry Tudor's rights became clearer. In 1485, Richard III died on the battlefield of Bosworth. Henry Tudor became King of England under the name Henry VII. Henry VIII was born on June 28, 1491 in Greenwich, England. He became the third child in the family of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York. At the age of fifteen, his older brother, Arthur, died. It was he who was to ascend the throne, but after his death the first claimant was Henry VIII. He received the title of Prince of Wales and began preparations for his coronation. Henry VIII reigned from 1509 to 1547. We will not examine the political life of this king. We will get into his bedchamber. It is these facts that are best known, or not, to the world's public. His father King Henry VII sought to expand England's influence and strengthen alliances with neighboring countries, so he insisted that his son marry Catherine of Aragon, daughter of the founders of the Spanish state and widow of his brother. Catherine was six years older and the only surviving children of the marriage were her daughter, Maria.
4 months ago
View on Instagram |
6/15
a little positive in the feed Немного позитива в ленту.
4 months ago
View on Instagram |
7/15
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
The artists did not skirt biblical stories either. Capitel with the Temptation of Jesus c. 1175-1200 This capital, probably originating from a monastery arcade, depicts the temptations of Jesus. The order of the narrative is inconsistent: the devil tempts Jesus to turn stones into bread; the devil tempts Jesus with the kingdoms of the world; the devil carries Jesus on his back to the top of the Temple; the devil tempts Jesus to throw himself from the top of the Temple. The naturalism of the capital forms, the antiquity of the flowing drapery that defines the anatomy of the figures, and the lively narrative quality are all hallmarks of the nascent Gothic style. An interesting subject is a capitel with an angel emerging from a cloud c. 1150-1200. France. The angel emerging from the cloud suggests that the figure on the column below completed the composition, perhaps it was the Virgin of the Annunciation. Capitals decorated with similar acanthus foliage can also be found in other churches in Burgundy, such as those at Avallon, Vézelay and Donzi-les-Prés. And on the way to the Gothic and mythical creatures is a capitel from Spain Capital with a centaur fighting a man with a bow and arrow ca. 1175-1200 This depicts a man and an animal fighting in a similar almost abstract manner. Centaur fighting man with bow and arrow.
4 months ago
View on Instagram |
8/15
We already know that antiquity gave us architectural orders. The Middle Ages changed the currencies and leaves of column capitals to amazing stone sculpture. In many monasteries in Europe, many scenes from the Bible, hagiographies of saints, allegorical images (as a confrontation of vices and virtues), as well as intimidating figures of demons and various monsters, beasts and men woven together, were carved on the capitals of columns on which galleries were leaned. The museum collection has interesting versions of such capitals. Capitel with four heads ca. 1225-50 In 863, a monk named Theodosius wrote of the greatness of Palermo, describing it as "full of citizens and strangers . . . Among the Sicilians, Greeks, Lombards and Jews mingled Arabs, Berbers, Persians, Tartars, Africans, some in long robes and turbans . . faces oval, square or round, of every build and profile, beards and hair of every color and haircut." The four heads emerging from the acanthus leaves and forming the corners of this capitol are indicative of Theodosius' comments. The heads are close in style to other examples of Apulian sculptors who worked at the court of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
We already know that antiquity gave us architectural orders. The Middle Ages changed the currencies and leaves of column capitals to amazing stone sculpture. In many monasteries in Europe, many scenes from the Bible, hagiographies of saints, allegorical images (as a confrontation of vices and virtues), as well as intimidating figures of demons and various monsters, beasts and men woven together, were carved on the capitals of columns on which galleries were leaned. The museum collection has interesting versions of such capitals. Capitel with four heads ca. 1225-50 In 863, a monk named Theodosius wrote of the greatness of Palermo, describing it as "full of citizens and strangers . . . Among the Sicilians, Greeks, Lombards and Jews mingled Arabs, Berbers, Persians, Tartars, Africans, some in long robes and turbans . . faces oval, square or round, of every build and profile, beards and hair of every color and haircut." The four heads emerging from the acanthus leaves and forming the corners of this capitol are indicative of Theodosius' comments. The heads are close in style to other examples of Apulian sculptors who worked at the court of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
We already know that antiquity gave us architectural orders. The Middle Ages changed the currencies and leaves of column capitals to amazing stone sculpture. In many monasteries in Europe, many scenes from the Bible, hagiographies of saints, allegorical images (as a confrontation of vices and virtues), as well as intimidating figures of demons and various monsters, beasts and men woven together, were carved on the capitals of columns on which galleries were leaned. The museum collection has interesting versions of such capitals. Capitel with four heads ca. 1225-50 In 863, a monk named Theodosius wrote of the greatness of Palermo, describing it as "full of citizens and strangers . . . Among the Sicilians, Greeks, Lombards and Jews mingled Arabs, Berbers, Persians, Tartars, Africans, some in long robes and turbans . . faces oval, square or round, of every build and profile, beards and hair of every color and haircut." The four heads emerging from the acanthus leaves and forming the corners of this capitol are indicative of Theodosius' comments. The heads are close in style to other examples of Apulian sculptors who worked at the court of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
We already know that antiquity gave us architectural orders. The Middle Ages changed the currencies and leaves of column capitals to amazing stone sculpture. In many monasteries in Europe, many scenes from the Bible, hagiographies of saints, allegorical images (as a confrontation of vices and virtues), as well as intimidating figures of demons and various monsters, beasts and men woven together, were carved on the capitals of columns on which galleries were leaned. The museum collection has interesting versions of such capitals. Capitel with four heads ca. 1225-50 In 863, a monk named Theodosius wrote of the greatness of Palermo, describing it as "full of citizens and strangers . . . Among the Sicilians, Greeks, Lombards and Jews mingled Arabs, Berbers, Persians, Tartars, Africans, some in long robes and turbans . . faces oval, square or round, of every build and profile, beards and hair of every color and haircut." The four heads emerging from the acanthus leaves and forming the corners of this capitol are indicative of Theodosius' comments. The heads are close in style to other examples of Apulian sculptors who worked at the court of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
We already know that antiquity gave us architectural orders. The Middle Ages changed the currencies and leaves of column capitals to amazing stone sculpture. In many monasteries in Europe, many scenes from the Bible, hagiographies of saints, allegorical images (as a confrontation of vices and virtues), as well as intimidating figures of demons and various monsters, beasts and men woven together, were carved on the capitals of columns on which galleries were leaned. The museum collection has interesting versions of such capitals. Capitel with four heads ca. 1225-50 In 863, a monk named Theodosius wrote of the greatness of Palermo, describing it as "full of citizens and strangers . . . Among the Sicilians, Greeks, Lombards and Jews mingled Arabs, Berbers, Persians, Tartars, Africans, some in long robes and turbans . . faces oval, square or round, of every build and profile, beards and hair of every color and haircut." The four heads emerging from the acanthus leaves and forming the corners of this capitol are indicative of Theodosius' comments. The heads are close in style to other examples of Apulian sculptors who worked at the court of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen. ⠀ Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
4 months ago
View on Instagram |
9/15
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period.
⠀
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
In the Scandinavian tradition, the Virgin looks a little different.  Virgin on Throne c. 1175-1200 Carved from a narrow bar of poplar, this figure was originally placed to be placed on an altar. The sculpture's elongated form and strong linear execution may be related to more similar works on the island of Gotland, where sculpture from the 1100s was heavily influenced by German art. And this is how the French artist saw it.  The Virgin and Child c. 1200. Metalwork combined with the use of enamel in the book and the engraving of the Virgin's crown and shoes, as well as the baby's hair, are characteristic of Limoges' work. Enamels of the type for which Limoges was famous are often found in Spain, and indeed this work belonged to a Spanish collector in the late nineteenth century. In Spain neither the political revolution nor the religious reformation provoked the mass destruction of church property that France experienced. But if we look north of France, we see a different tradition. The Blessed Virgin Mary with Child c. 1210-20 Crowned as the Queen of Heaven, Mary sits on an ornate throne and the infant Jesus holds a ball or apple and blesses. Mary also triumphantly tramples the dragon, a visual reference to the Book of Genesis (3:15), in which God declares the serpent: "I will put enmity between thee and the woman." The smooth drapery style is a hallmark of northern sculpture circa 1200. And German sculpture is several decades younger still. Blessed Virgin and Child c. 1280 This throne-sitting Virgin and Child, triumphing over two dragons, reflects an image from the Book of Psalms (91:13): "You will walk on the aspite and the basilisk, and you will trample with your feet the lion and the dragon." The lively facial expression and the emphasis on heavy forms of drapery are characteristic of the stone sculpture of the Regensburg Cathedral in Bavaria in the late thirteenth century. Recent preservation has revealed the best-preserved of several layers of paint from the Baroque period. ⠀ Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
4 months ago
View on Instagram |
10/15
The Church taught that if sin entered the world through the first woman, Eve, then salvation from sin also entered through Our Lady Mary, for the atoning death of Jesus Christ was only possible after His earthly birth by Mary. In the East for the first time Her name was given to temples (4th century), Her images were painted, and church festivals were introduced in Her honor (5th century). The Council of Ephesus in the East in 431 deemed it possible to call the Virgin Mary "the Mother of God". Thus the cult of the Virgin Mary merged with the basic tenets of early Christianity and took a prominent place in this new religion.
The first known sculptural image of Our Lady, the so-called Golden Virgin of Essen, was commissioned by the granddaughter of Otto II, Abbess Matilda, presumably around 980 . This is how the sculpture returned to art. In the collection of the Metropolitan, the Virgin and Child in Greatness ca. 1175-1200 In medieval sculpture, individual body parts were often emphasized to convey meaning. Here Mary's huge hands direct our attention to Jesus, seated on his mother's lap. This type of sculpture, very popular in the twelfth century, is known as the Throne of Wisdom. As a miniature adult, Jesus as the Son of God is the embodiment of Wisdom. He would grab the Bible, another reference to the concept of divine wisdom he embodies. Mary is both a sculpture and a vessel: her body has a cavity behind her shoulder, suggesting that the work was a receptacle for holy relics. Such religious statues may have been carried in church processions.
The Church taught that if sin entered the world through the first woman, Eve, then salvation from sin also entered through Our Lady Mary, for the atoning death of Jesus Christ was only possible after His earthly birth by Mary. In the East for the first time Her name was given to temples (4th century), Her images were painted, and church festivals were introduced in Her honor (5th century). The Council of Ephesus in the East in 431 deemed it possible to call the Virgin Mary "the Mother of God". Thus the cult of the Virgin Mary merged with the basic tenets of early Christianity and took a prominent place in this new religion.
The first known sculptural image of Our Lady, the so-called Golden Virgin of Essen, was commissioned by the granddaughter of Otto II, Abbess Matilda, presumably around 980 . This is how the sculpture returned to art. In the collection of the Metropolitan, the Virgin and Child in Greatness ca. 1175-1200 In medieval sculpture, individual body parts were often emphasized to convey meaning. Here Mary's huge hands direct our attention to Jesus, seated on his mother's lap. This type of sculpture, very popular in the twelfth century, is known as the Throne of Wisdom. As a miniature adult, Jesus as the Son of God is the embodiment of Wisdom. He would grab the Bible, another reference to the concept of divine wisdom he embodies. Mary is both a sculpture and a vessel: her body has a cavity behind her shoulder, suggesting that the work was a receptacle for holy relics. Such religious statues may have been carried in church processions.
The Church taught that if sin entered the world through the first woman, Eve, then salvation from sin also entered through Our Lady Mary, for the atoning death of Jesus Christ was only possible after His earthly birth by Mary. In the East for the first time Her name was given to temples (4th century), Her images were painted, and church festivals were introduced in Her honor (5th century). The Council of Ephesus in the East in 431 deemed it possible to call the Virgin Mary "the Mother of God". Thus the cult of the Virgin Mary merged with the basic tenets of early Christianity and took a prominent place in this new religion.
The first known sculptural image of Our Lady, the so-called Golden Virgin of Essen, was commissioned by the granddaughter of Otto II, Abbess Matilda, presumably around 980 . This is how the sculpture returned to art. In the collection of the Metropolitan, the Virgin and Child in Greatness ca. 1175-1200 In medieval sculpture, individual body parts were often emphasized to convey meaning. Here Mary's huge hands direct our attention to Jesus, seated on his mother's lap. This type of sculpture, very popular in the twelfth century, is known as the Throne of Wisdom. As a miniature adult, Jesus as the Son of God is the embodiment of Wisdom. He would grab the Bible, another reference to the concept of divine wisdom he embodies. Mary is both a sculpture and a vessel: her body has a cavity behind her shoulder, suggesting that the work was a receptacle for holy relics. Such religious statues may have been carried in church processions.
The Church taught that if sin entered the world through the first woman, Eve, then salvation from sin also entered through Our Lady Mary, for the atoning death of Jesus Christ was only possible after His earthly birth by Mary. In the East for the first time Her name was given to temples (4th century), Her images were painted, and church festivals were introduced in Her honor (5th century). The Council of Ephesus in the East in 431 deemed it possible to call the Virgin Mary "the Mother of God". Thus the cult of the Virgin Mary merged with the basic tenets of early Christianity and took a prominent place in this new religion.
The first known sculptural image of Our Lady, the so-called Golden Virgin of Essen, was commissioned by the granddaughter of Otto II, Abbess Matilda, presumably around 980 . This is how the sculpture returned to art. In the collection of the Metropolitan, the Virgin and Child in Greatness ca. 1175-1200 In medieval sculpture, individual body parts were often emphasized to convey meaning. Here Mary's huge hands direct our attention to Jesus, seated on his mother's lap. This type of sculpture, very popular in the twelfth century, is known as the Throne of Wisdom. As a miniature adult, Jesus as the Son of God is the embodiment of Wisdom. He would grab the Bible, another reference to the concept of divine wisdom he embodies. Mary is both a sculpture and a vessel: her body has a cavity behind her shoulder, suggesting that the work was a receptacle for holy relics. Such religious statues may have been carried in church processions.
The Church taught that if sin entered the world through the first woman, Eve, then salvation from sin also entered through Our Lady Mary, for the atoning death of Jesus Christ was only possible after His earthly birth by Mary. In the East for the first time Her name was given to temples (4th century), Her images were painted, and church festivals were introduced in Her honor (5th century). The Council of Ephesus in the East in 431 deemed it possible to call the Virgin Mary "the Mother of God". Thus the cult of the Virgin Mary merged with the basic tenets of early Christianity and took a prominent place in this new religion.
The first known sculptural image of Our Lady, the so-called Golden Virgin of Essen, was commissioned by the granddaughter of Otto II, Abbess Matilda, presumably around 980 . This is how the sculpture returned to art. In the collection of the Metropolitan, the Virgin and Child in Greatness ca. 1175-1200 In medieval sculpture, individual body parts were often emphasized to convey meaning. Here Mary's huge hands direct our attention to Jesus, seated on his mother's lap. This type of sculpture, very popular in the twelfth century, is known as the Throne of Wisdom. As a miniature adult, Jesus as the Son of God is the embodiment of Wisdom. He would grab the Bible, another reference to the concept of divine wisdom he embodies. Mary is both a sculpture and a vessel: her body has a cavity behind her shoulder, suggesting that the work was a receptacle for holy relics. Such religious statues may have been carried in church processions.
The Church taught that if sin entered the world through the first woman, Eve, then salvation from sin also entered through Our Lady Mary, for the atoning death of Jesus Christ was only possible after His earthly birth by Mary. In the East for the first time Her name was given to temples (4th century), Her images were painted, and church festivals were introduced in Her honor (5th century). The Council of Ephesus in the East in 431 deemed it possible to call the Virgin Mary "the Mother of God". Thus the cult of the Virgin Mary merged with the basic tenets of early Christianity and took a prominent place in this new religion. The first known sculptural image of Our Lady, the so-called Golden Virgin of Essen, was commissioned by the granddaughter of Otto II, Abbess Matilda, presumably around 980 . This is how the sculpture returned to art. In the collection of the Metropolitan, the Virgin and Child in Greatness ca. 1175-1200 In medieval sculpture, individual body parts were often emphasized to convey meaning. Here Mary's huge hands direct our attention to Jesus, seated on his mother's lap. This type of sculpture, very popular in the twelfth century, is known as the Throne of Wisdom. As a miniature adult, Jesus as the Son of God is the embodiment of Wisdom. He would grab the Bible, another reference to the concept of divine wisdom he embodies. Mary is both a sculpture and a vessel: her body has a cavity behind her shoulder, suggesting that the work was a receptacle for holy relics. Such religious statues may have been carried in church processions.
4 months ago
View on Instagram |
11/15
#museum #Art #NewYork #МЕТ #Metropolitan #art history #Ancient Egypt #Ancient Greece #Ancient Rome #Middle Ages
5 months ago
View on Instagram |
12/15
Niagara - the name of the famous waterfall comes from the language of the Indians who lived here - the Iroquois and means, according to different versions, either "dividing in half", or, more poetically, "thundering water".
Niagara Falls appeared several thousand years ago, when streams of water formed as a result of the melting of a retreating glacier washed their channel in soft sandstones. The Niagara River carved a deep gorge into them until the harder rock was exposed. So it turned out a cliff from which thousands of tons of water fall down. The characteristic greenish color of Niagara is due precisely to the high content of rock particles dissolved in the waters of the river.
It is believed that in ten thousand years the waterfall has risen about eleven kilometers upstream of the river, this movement continues today at a rate of about thirty centimeters per year. According to scientists, in about fifty thousand years, the cliff will reach Lake Erie and Niagara Falls will cease to exist. Niagara is a complex of waterfalls, the total width of which is more than a kilometer. Goat Island (Goat) divides the river into two branches, forming the "Canadian" and "American" parts of the waterfall. The Canadian part of the waterfall is called because of the characteristic shape of the "Horseshoe", from the US side, a small island of the Moon separates a narrow strip of the "Veil" waterfall from the "American Falls".
The main volume of Niagara's water flows through the Horseshoe Falls. The width of the waterfall is about 670 meters, the depth in the central part is about 3 meters. Streams of water cross the crest of the waterfall at a speed of about 32 kilometers per hour and fall 53 meters down.
The width of the American Falls is about 250 m., the depth of the river on the crest is about 60 centimeters. Numerous rockfalls formed a huge stone embankment at the foot of the waterfall, so the height of the water fall here is much lower than at the Horseshoe - from 21 to 34 meters.
Near the American is the smallest of the Niagara Falls - Fata. It is only 17 meters wide and 24 meters high.
You can watch a ten minute video on my channel.
https://youtu.be/AfOef5vnldg
Niagara - the name of the famous waterfall comes from the language of the Indians who lived here - the Iroquois and means, according to different versions, either "dividing in half", or, more poetically, "thundering water".
Niagara Falls appeared several thousand years ago, when streams of water formed as a result of the melting of a retreating glacier washed their channel in soft sandstones. The Niagara River carved a deep gorge into them until the harder rock was exposed. So it turned out a cliff from which thousands of tons of water fall down. The characteristic greenish color of Niagara is due precisely to the high content of rock particles dissolved in the waters of the river.
It is believed that in ten thousand years the waterfall has risen about eleven kilometers upstream of the river, this movement continues today at a rate of about thirty centimeters per year. According to scientists, in about fifty thousand years, the cliff will reach Lake Erie and Niagara Falls will cease to exist. Niagara is a complex of waterfalls, the total width of which is more than a kilometer. Goat Island (Goat) divides the river into two branches, forming the "Canadian" and "American" parts of the waterfall. The Canadian part of the waterfall is called because of the characteristic shape of the "Horseshoe", from the US side, a small island of the Moon separates a narrow strip of the "Veil" waterfall from the "American Falls".
The main volume of Niagara's water flows through the Horseshoe Falls. The width of the waterfall is about 670 meters, the depth in the central part is about 3 meters. Streams of water cross the crest of the waterfall at a speed of about 32 kilometers per hour and fall 53 meters down.
The width of the American Falls is about 250 m., the depth of the river on the crest is about 60 centimeters. Numerous rockfalls formed a huge stone embankment at the foot of the waterfall, so the height of the water fall here is much lower than at the Horseshoe - from 21 to 34 meters.
Near the American is the smallest of the Niagara Falls - Fata. It is only 17 meters wide and 24 meters high.
You can watch a ten minute video on my channel.
https://youtu.be/AfOef5vnldg
Niagara - the name of the famous waterfall comes from the language of the Indians who lived here - the Iroquois and means, according to different versions, either "dividing in half", or, more poetically, "thundering water".
Niagara Falls appeared several thousand years ago, when streams of water formed as a result of the melting of a retreating glacier washed their channel in soft sandstones. The Niagara River carved a deep gorge into them until the harder rock was exposed. So it turned out a cliff from which thousands of tons of water fall down. The characteristic greenish color of Niagara is due precisely to the high content of rock particles dissolved in the waters of the river.
It is believed that in ten thousand years the waterfall has risen about eleven kilometers upstream of the river, this movement continues today at a rate of about thirty centimeters per year. According to scientists, in about fifty thousand years, the cliff will reach Lake Erie and Niagara Falls will cease to exist. Niagara is a complex of waterfalls, the total width of which is more than a kilometer. Goat Island (Goat) divides the river into two branches, forming the "Canadian" and "American" parts of the waterfall. The Canadian part of the waterfall is called because of the characteristic shape of the "Horseshoe", from the US side, a small island of the Moon separates a narrow strip of the "Veil" waterfall from the "American Falls".
The main volume of Niagara's water flows through the Horseshoe Falls. The width of the waterfall is about 670 meters, the depth in the central part is about 3 meters. Streams of water cross the crest of the waterfall at a speed of about 32 kilometers per hour and fall 53 meters down.
The width of the American Falls is about 250 m., the depth of the river on the crest is about 60 centimeters. Numerous rockfalls formed a huge stone embankment at the foot of the waterfall, so the height of the water fall here is much lower than at the Horseshoe - from 21 to 34 meters.
Near the American is the smallest of the Niagara Falls - Fata. It is only 17 meters wide and 24 meters high.
You can watch a ten minute video on my channel.
https://youtu.be/AfOef5vnldg
Niagara - the name of the famous waterfall comes from the language of the Indians who lived here - the Iroquois and means, according to different versions, either "dividing in half", or, more poetically, "thundering water".
Niagara Falls appeared several thousand years ago, when streams of water formed as a result of the melting of a retreating glacier washed their channel in soft sandstones. The Niagara River carved a deep gorge into them until the harder rock was exposed. So it turned out a cliff from which thousands of tons of water fall down. The characteristic greenish color of Niagara is due precisely to the high content of rock particles dissolved in the waters of the river.
It is believed that in ten thousand years the waterfall has risen about eleven kilometers upstream of the river, this movement continues today at a rate of about thirty centimeters per year. According to scientists, in about fifty thousand years, the cliff will reach Lake Erie and Niagara Falls will cease to exist. Niagara is a complex of waterfalls, the total width of which is more than a kilometer. Goat Island (Goat) divides the river into two branches, forming the "Canadian" and "American" parts of the waterfall. The Canadian part of the waterfall is called because of the characteristic shape of the "Horseshoe", from the US side, a small island of the Moon separates a narrow strip of the "Veil" waterfall from the "American Falls".
The main volume of Niagara's water flows through the Horseshoe Falls. The width of the waterfall is about 670 meters, the depth in the central part is about 3 meters. Streams of water cross the crest of the waterfall at a speed of about 32 kilometers per hour and fall 53 meters down.
The width of the American Falls is about 250 m., the depth of the river on the crest is about 60 centimeters. Numerous rockfalls formed a huge stone embankment at the foot of the waterfall, so the height of the water fall here is much lower than at the Horseshoe - from 21 to 34 meters.
Near the American is the smallest of the Niagara Falls - Fata. It is only 17 meters wide and 24 meters high.
You can watch a ten minute video on my channel.
https://youtu.be/AfOef5vnldg
Niagara - the name of the famous waterfall comes from the language of the Indians who lived here - the Iroquois and means, according to different versions, either "dividing in half", or, more poetically, "thundering water". Niagara Falls appeared several thousand years ago, when streams of water formed as a result of the melting of a retreating glacier washed their channel in soft sandstones. The Niagara River carved a deep gorge into them until the harder rock was exposed. So it turned out a cliff from which thousands of tons of water fall down. The characteristic greenish color of Niagara is due precisely to the high content of rock particles dissolved in the waters of the river. It is believed that in ten thousand years the waterfall has risen about eleven kilometers upstream of the river, this movement continues today at a rate of about thirty centimeters per year. According to scientists, in about fifty thousand years, the cliff will reach Lake Erie and Niagara Falls will cease to exist. Niagara is a complex of waterfalls, the total width of which is more than a kilometer. Goat Island (Goat) divides the river into two branches, forming the "Canadian" and "American" parts of the waterfall. The Canadian part of the waterfall is called because of the characteristic shape of the "Horseshoe", from the US side, a small island of the Moon separates a narrow strip of the "Veil" waterfall from the "American Falls". The main volume of Niagara's water flows through the Horseshoe Falls. The width of the waterfall is about 670 meters, the depth in the central part is about 3 meters. Streams of water cross the crest of the waterfall at a speed of about 32 kilometers per hour and fall 53 meters down. The width of the American Falls is about 250 m., the depth of the river on the crest is about 60 centimeters. Numerous rockfalls formed a huge stone embankment at the foot of the waterfall, so the height of the water fall here is much lower than at the Horseshoe - from 21 to 34 meters. Near the American is the smallest of the Niagara Falls - Fata. It is only 17 meters wide and 24 meters high. You can watch a ten minute video on my channel. https://youtu.be/AfOef5vnldg
5 months ago
View on Instagram |
15/15

LogoHERE COMES THE BEST MUSEUM THEME EVER

PURCHASE NOW